Some Music Cartoons

Here is an example of some niche market cartoons. Most of these have proved to be popular reprints.

I think this joke/pun is good and the cartoon was turned down everywhere when I first submitted it. BBC Music Magazine (a classical music magazine) finally saw it and bought it on the spot. It's been reprinted a couple of times in other places.

The above risque cartoon never got bought by the good folks at BBC Music Mag. A matter of fact, I don't think anyone bought it, but I always liked it. No reason concert goers can't have a moment of raw, animal emotion!

OK, it's that moody Beethoven guy getting the ladies to feel sorry for him. The sad thing is the ladies can tell him they can feel his pain, but he cannot hear them. An unsold cartoon. Perhaps there are too many people out there that can't take the big B off his pedestal!

Wall Street Journal ran the above odd one and I think it was in an overseas mag as well. Look at all those small pen strokes I was using at that time.

(My Vista program is interfering with my cartoon file log and I cannot open it, otherwise I would be able to talk more specifically about where these cartoons appeared, darn it.)

Above: I thought this was a dopey joke about a famous Schubert piece. But, to my surprise, it got printed and reprinted. I guess the guy has a point.

Above: a perennial that's been used a number of times. Most recently is was used in a scholarly paper in The International Journal of Interdisciplinary Sciences.

Yes, really!

I like the blank look on the dog's face.

Above: an early, inky, wordless cartoon showing our then sweet kitty Opie walking on the keys. This was bought by Reader's Digest but I've never seen it in print.

Above: The Macaroni Trio. This odd cartoon got a couple of buys. Sometimes it helps to imagine inanimate objects behaving like people; toasters playing baseball, dancing cigarette packages, etc.

Above: this is a true music factoid. Did you know that bass players have to pay for an airplane seat for their mega-size cellos??? True!! The above cartoon has seen print many times in music publications.

Above: the Chronicle of Higher Education ran the octopus cartoon, which was subsequently reprinted in a couple of other places. This is from years ago. I remember doodling the octopus with all the instruments and then his agent, forcing him to perform. And then the logical, scientific part of me remembered that octopi need to be in sea water, so the octopus would, of course, be dying if he was in, for instance, a theatrical talent scout's office.

SNAFU: the writing on the door should be backward.

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